Prevention

Are Sunscreens Safe? FDA Studies Suggest Its Time We Get Answers

Are sunscreens safe?

That’s the question that will be on the minds of many as the Food and Drug Administration releases a second study on the absorption of sunscreens. The reality is that answering the “safe” question is becoming more complicated—and more important as well, given the fact that so many of us use sunscreens as part of our own sun safety efforts, while others (me included) use sunscreen as part of our daily routine.

Despite the questions raised in this study, the FDA concludes:

“These findings do not indicate that individuals should refrain from the use of sunscreen.” (Emphasis mine)

It is a difficult balancing act pitting product safety up against the prevention of some very nasty cancers. It leaves many consumers and experts in the midst of a quandary of what to do and what to recommend.… Continue reading →

The American Cancer Society’s 2020 Cancer Statistics Report: Remarkable Progress And Opportunities To Do Even Better

The American Cancer Society’s annual report on cancer statistics has been published, and it brings with it more “good news” about the progress against cancer. However, there are also some notable areas of concern that should lead us to reinforce our focus on what we need to do to continue to reduce the burden and suffering from cancer in the United States—and make even more progress.

The good news is that the decline in the rate of deaths from cancer continues to improve: from 1991 (when the cancer death rate in this country was at its peak) until 2017 (the most recent year for which data is available) there was a decline of 29% in the cancer death rate. That translates into 2.9 million fewer deaths from cancer than would have been expected had the rate of cancer deaths not changed from 1991.

And while all most other non-cancer related causes of deaths were increasing or remaining stable, the rate of deaths from cancer declined by a remarkable 2.2% from 2016 to 2017, continuing a long string of declines over many years. This was in fact the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality since rates began falling in the early … Continue reading →

Cancer And The “Cure”

Words have meaning. And when it comes to cancer, especially advanced cancer, there aren’t many words that have more meaning than the word “cure.” Yet it is that very word and concept that is top of mind for some of us these days.

We clinicians are guilty as charged when it comes to reluctance declaring those who have had a remarkable response to treatments for advanced cancer “cured.” Experience has taught us over decades that we have misused the word and overpromised those we cared for. Our patients and loved ones have paid a price for our over optimism. Consequently, our culture has taught us to avoid the word, lest we be shown to have been less-than-truthful when a cancer returns with a vengeance.

And yet our world is changing: we are now seeing long term responses to treatments in diseases where until recently we had little hope of such success.

Recent reports of rapidly declining mortality in melanoma, normal life spans for many people treated for previously fatal diseases like chronic myelogenous leukemia, and the potential for impressive gains in outcomes for people with lung cancer are but a few examples that suggest we are indeed in … Continue reading →

What Will It Take To Shake The Tree And Save More Lives From Lung Cancer: A Report From ASCO 2019

Every year, the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology is unmatched in bringing forward the latest advances in cancer care. It is a time to learn about important—and usually– incremental advances in cancer research and cancer care, and every year has some of us, especially those of us with some years under our belts, thinking about big picture themes in cancer: where we’ve been, where we are, and where we’re going.

For me, today’s theme is lung cancer and the sad fact that our care for those at high risk and those  diagnosed with the disease is far from what it should be. But more than I ever, I am convinced the future holds hope.… Continue reading →

The Remarkable Story No One Is Talking About: The Substantial Decline In Deaths From Advanced Melanoma

Here is some news about cancer that isn’t widely known and is hiding in plain sight: Deaths from melanoma—a skin cancer that has lethal potential—have declined dramatically over the past several years. And while that fact alone is surprising, so is the reason behind the drop.

Let’s make something clear at the outset: too many people die from melanoma. It is not the most common skin cancer (the American Cancer Society estimates 96,480 people in the United States will be diagnosed with melanoma in 2019, and 7,230 will die from it), but it is much more likely to spread and lead to death than most other much more common forms of skin cancer. And it has too frequently been a fatal disease.

That is now beginning to change, thanks in part to public awareness and earlier diagnosis. However, we can’t ignore what may be the most important factor: much better treatments. In fact, improvement in treatments with targeted drugs and immunotherapies have now begun to have a considerable impact saving lives for those with advanced melanoma.… Continue reading →

The American Cancer Society Sets A Goal To Reduce The Burden Of Cancer: Are We Up To The Challenge?

Ever wonder what would happen to cancer in this country if we all did better at what we do every day?

The American Cancer Society has an answer in a recently published paper in our journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, and it may surprise you what we could accomplish if we set our minds to the task.

We recently reported that between 1990 and 2015, the cancer death rate declined by 27%. That’s a remarkable accomplishment. However, we still have a long way to go. Too many of us experience the burdens and losses from cancer. All of us want to see this disease in its many forms vanquished.

Our researchers looked at what would happen if all of us had the same cancer risk as college graduates in the United States, then came up with an estimate of how that would impact deaths from cancer from 2015 and 2035.

The answer: we could reduce deaths from cancer by close to another 40% beyond what we have already accomplished. That would be a total of over 54% from 1990. And it would mean 1.3 million fewer premature deaths from cancer between 2020 and 2035. Remarkably, it would mean … Continue reading →

Cancer Statistics 2019: Cancer Death Rates Have Declined 27% In 25 Years, And We Still Have A Long Way To Go

Good news is always welcome, especially when talking about something as serious as cancer. And there is plenty of welcome information in the American Cancer Society’s release today of our annual report on “Cancer Statistics, 2019” and its accompanying consumer-oriented version of “Cancer Facts & Figures 2019.”

Among the good news in this report: A significant decline in death rates from cancer—especially among some of the most common cancers, significant improvements in early detection and treatment of cancer, and a decrease in the disparities in death rates between African-Americans and whites.

Despite the good news, unfortunately, there are also pieces of the puzzle that have not been solved. And to ignore that information is a disservice to those who struggle with cancer and those who have passed because of this dread disease. The reality is we can—indeed, we must—do better. And that fact is an equally important part of the information contained in this report.… Continue reading →

Times Change, Our Bodies Change, And Now The Body Mass Index (BMI) Guidelines May Change Too

A recent news story in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) reminds me that lots of things in our lives are changing these days, not the least of which is the shape of our bodies.

Oh, my. This aging thing isn’t so easy, and that is really the message behind Rita Rubin’s timely piece about shifting body mass and muscle as we age and its implications. Although focused on women, I can attest personally that men fall into the same trap as well. That 250 pounds when you are older simply is not the same 250 pounds when you were in college. Now 250 pounds looks more like 280—even though the scale still says 250. Go figure…

Although I may be trying to provide a little humor to the subject, the reality is it’s not humorous when it comes to our health. As we age, muscle turns to fat. In a process called “sarcopenia,” muscle begins an inexorable march to become fat, and for most of us it doesn’t make too much difference how much we try to forestall the shift. It is programmed into our bodies, and although exercise might help, Mother Nature simply doesn’t … Continue reading →

Chewing Gum To Detect Cancer: Reporting The Hype, Diminishing The Facts

Sometimes It’s important to know the news behind the news: the comments and the cautions that don’t get into the article that the public gets to read. It’s the sort of thing that keeps me up at night: trying to convey the reality, while realizing what most people want to hear is the hope.

That’s the problem I have with a story posted on a major news network website yesterday, where I have a brief quotation that failed to capture the thoughts I tried to express at the time of the interview. The reporter had very limited time, and the information I wanted to provide was complicated. Instead of the caution I tried to convey to counter the potential “hype” about chewing gum to find cancer early, the report suggests that this is a test that will be available soon—while failing to inform how complicated it would be to achieve that goal.… Continue reading →

Few Boomers Get Hepatitis C Test Even Though It Can Save Lives

Are you a baby boomer? Have you been tested for hepatitis C virus (HCV)? Do you know why you should be tested for hepatitis C? Do you even know what hepatitis C is?

According to research published today by my colleagues from the American Cancer Society in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the odds are overwhelming that if you are in the boomer generation you have not been tested for the virus, and that has me wondering why that is the case. Could it be that we don’t know about hepatitis C? Could it be that our health professionals aren’t recommending testing? Could it be that the costs of treatment may be seen as a barrier to care?

Why is this important? Because if you do have hepatitis C you are at risk of dying from liver cancer and other diseases. The kicker: the deadly results of hepatitis C can be prevented with an effective, albeit expensive treatment. Deaths from liver cancer in the United States are increasing more rapidly than any other type of cancer, according to a recent report. And even when localized at diagnosis, liver cancer is most often fatal.

It doesn’t necessarily have … Continue reading →