Lung Cancer

Cancer And The “Cure”

Words have meaning. And when it comes to cancer, especially advanced cancer, there aren’t many words that have more meaning than the word “cure.” Yet it is that very word and concept that is top of mind for some of us these days.

We clinicians are guilty as charged when it comes to reluctance declaring those who have had a remarkable response to treatments for advanced cancer “cured.” Experience has taught us over decades that we have misused the word and overpromised those we cared for. Our patients and loved ones have paid a price for our over optimism. Consequently, our culture has taught us to avoid the word, lest we be shown to have been less-than-truthful when a cancer returns with a vengeance.

And yet our world is changing: we are now seeing long term responses to treatments in diseases where until recently we had little hope of such success.

Recent reports of rapidly declining mortality in melanoma, normal life spans for many people treated for previously fatal diseases like chronic myelogenous leukemia, and the potential for impressive gains in outcomes for people with lung cancer are but a few examples that suggest we are indeed in … Continue reading →

A Plea For A Focus On The Humanity Of Cancer Care: Are We Missing An Opportunity When It Comes To Artificial Intelligence?

Yesterday I wrote about emerging themes at the ongoing annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here in Chicago. That blog was about lung cancer, and the reality that the time has come to aggressively address our failures to improve outcomes for those at risk of lung cancer and those diagnosed with the disease.

Today I want to share some thoughts about another theme: artificial intelligence, or as I prefer to call it “data analytics.” Fundamentally: how can we capture the capability of analytics to improve the care and outcomes of cancer patients? And more importantly: how can we harness this technology to help bring back the human touch in cancer care?

Admittedly that’s a large focus covering lots of opportunities. Speak to one expert and you will get one idea of how analytics could improve care. Speak to another and you will get another entirely different view of what that means and how we should be using our rapidly advancing capabilities to harness machines and their capacity to learn and engage health care, specifically cancer care.

My real concern is that there are so many sophisticated opportunities to choose from that we may be missing some … Continue reading →

What Will It Take To Shake The Tree And Save More Lives From Lung Cancer: A Report From ASCO 2019

Every year, the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology is unmatched in bringing forward the latest advances in cancer care. It is a time to learn about important—and usually– incremental advances in cancer research and cancer care, and every year has some of us, especially those of us with some years under our belts, thinking about big picture themes in cancer: where we’ve been, where we are, and where we’re going.

For me, today’s theme is lung cancer and the sad fact that our care for those at high risk and those  diagnosed with the disease is far from what it should be. But more than I ever, I am convinced the future holds hope.… Continue reading →

The American Cancer Society Sets A Goal To Reduce The Burden Of Cancer: Are We Up To The Challenge?

Ever wonder what would happen to cancer in this country if we all did better at what we do every day?

The American Cancer Society has an answer in a recently published paper in our journal CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, and it may surprise you what we could accomplish if we set our minds to the task.

We recently reported that between 1990 and 2015, the cancer death rate declined by 27%. That’s a remarkable accomplishment. However, we still have a long way to go. Too many of us experience the burdens and losses from cancer. All of us want to see this disease in its many forms vanquished.

Our researchers looked at what would happen if all of us had the same cancer risk as college graduates in the United States, then came up with an estimate of how that would impact deaths from cancer from 2015 and 2035.

The answer: we could reduce deaths from cancer by close to another 40% beyond what we have already accomplished. That would be a total of over 54% from 1990. And it would mean 1.3 million fewer premature deaths from cancer between 2020 and 2035. Remarkably, it would mean … Continue reading →

A Cure For Cancer? Not So Fast

The news report in the Jerusalem Post regarding researchers’ claim that they have found a cure for cancer is certain to get our attention. And, it goes without saying, we all share the aspirational hope that they are correct. Unfortunately, we must be aware that this is far from proven as an effective treatment for people with cancer, let alone a cure.… Continue reading →

Cancer Statistics 2019: Cancer Death Rates Have Declined 27% In 25 Years, And We Still Have A Long Way To Go

Good news is always welcome, especially when talking about something as serious as cancer. And there is plenty of welcome information in the American Cancer Society’s release today of our annual report on “Cancer Statistics, 2019” and its accompanying consumer-oriented version of “Cancer Facts & Figures 2019.”

Among the good news in this report: A significant decline in death rates from cancer—especially among some of the most common cancers, significant improvements in early detection and treatment of cancer, and a decrease in the disparities in death rates between African-Americans and whites.

Despite the good news, unfortunately, there are also pieces of the puzzle that have not been solved. And to ignore that information is a disservice to those who struggle with cancer and those who have passed because of this dread disease. The reality is we can—indeed, we must—do better. And that fact is an equally important part of the information contained in this report.… Continue reading →

Justice Ginsburg Diagnosed With Cancer In the Lung: What We Know–And What We Don’t Know

The announcement today that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has undergone surgery for cancer in her lung reminds us all that in situations like this we need to be cautious in speculating as to exactly what has happened to the Justice. Notwithstanding information that has been made available to the public in several reports, we need to be aware that there is likely additional information that is not yet available to the media and others.

As in similar situations where those who are in the public arena—be they judges, politicians, actors/actresses or other celebrities—the information they choose to share is usually carefully vetted before being released. Sometimes the information is freely provided. Other times, it is kept very private. Either way, we need to respect those decisions which can be very personal.… Continue reading →

In Praise of Hope

In Praise of Hope

Reading the headlines in the morning newspaper lately can downright depressing. After all, this is supposed to be a holiday season, a time of celebration—not one of a continuing cacophony of conflict at every level.

It was with that feeling that I recalled three conversations I had recently with people who have various cancers. And I realized that despite all the chaos around us, maybe it’s time to say something in praise of hope.

Hope is very real, especially when you or a loved one or someone you know is diagnosed and treated for cancer. Hope is that to which we cling to get us through the difficult days and weeks. Hope is what keeps us looking forward, hope is what we pray for.

We know hope itself cannot change the physical world. It can’t create success. If it could, no patient would ever succumb to this dread disease. However, for the three folks I spoke to, there are very real reasons to be hopeful.… Continue reading →

A New Treatment With Immunotherapy Brings A Moment Of Hope For Patients With Lung Cancer

Lung cancer treatment is clearly the story of the week coming out of the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Chicago. And although media coverage of this emerging information about the role of immunotherapy in lung cancer has been extensive, there is—as always—more to the story, especially if you look closely at the numbers and in particular if you are a non-smoker with lung cancer.

One study stands out among the others in which immunotherapy along with chemotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with certain forms of lung cancer when compared to chemotherapy alone. Not only was that study reported at the Chicago meeting, it was also published simultaneously in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, offering us considerable detail into how the study was performed and the results.… Continue reading →

Chewing Gum To Detect Cancer: Reporting The Hype, Diminishing The Facts

Sometimes It’s important to know the news behind the news: the comments and the cautions that don’t get into the article that the public gets to read. It’s the sort of thing that keeps me up at night: trying to convey the reality, while realizing what most people want to hear is the hope.

That’s the problem I have with a story posted on a major news network website yesterday, where I have a brief quotation that failed to capture the thoughts I tried to express at the time of the interview. The reporter had very limited time, and the information I wanted to provide was complicated. Instead of the caution I tried to convey to counter the potential “hype” about chewing gum to find cancer early, the report suggests that this is a test that will be available soon—while failing to inform how complicated it would be to achieve that goal.… Continue reading →