Exercise

Some Of The Answers To Cancer Care May Be Found With Our Companion Dogs Walking Right Beside Us

Fate can work in mysterious ways.

A couple of months ago I was invited to participate in a symposium conducted by the National Cancer Policy Board at the Institute of Medicine in Washington DC. The topic was cancer in dogs, and how we might find ways to benefit dogs, their owners and science to better inform the treatment of cancer in humans through what is called “comparative oncology”.  It was an unusual topic in my experience and that of my colleagues, so I eagerly anticipated learning about something I hadn’t given much consideration to in the past.

Little did I know at the time how personal this journey was going to be for me and my family.

Shortly after I accepted the invitation, we received sad news: our Golden Retriever Lily-who has been a member of our family for 11 years-developed swelling in her face. Our vet saw her the next day and told us she had lymphoma. The outlook without treatment wasn’t good, and with treatment wasn’t much better.  

Tears flowed in our home that evening.

A week later we found a mass on Lily’s back leg. Another trip to the vet, another needle biopsy, and another … Continue reading →

Breast Cancer Awareness Is About More Than Mammograms: What You Need To Know

It’s October and that means we are about to see a lot of pink for the next 31 days. And virtually all of the work comes down to one simple -some might say overly simple-message: get a mammogram.

But as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM), begins, I find myself one again asking some difficult questions: Are we really looking at the right side of the equation? Is it all about mammograms? Is there more to the story? The answer is absolutely unequivocal and without a moments hesitation: YES! [more]

There’s no doubt NBCAM  is a big deal. In fact it’s probably the biggest cancer care effort for the entire year. It has been enormously successful in bringing attention to breast cancer and creating public focus on a very important issue for women and the men who love them, even as it does crowd out attention to other cancers that also deserve our attention, like lung, childhood cancer, ovarian cancer, and on and on.

And why shouldn’t we highlight mammography’s role? In the bad old days, as a much younger oncologist, I used to dream of a day when we could have not only better treatments for cancer, … Continue reading →

Ultraviolet Bad: Surgeon General Issues A Call To Action To Prevent Skin Cancer

(Note: This blog was originally published on another American Cancer Society website on July 29 because of technical problems on this site. Those have now been resolved and it is now reposted here. We appreciate your understanding.)

 

“Ultraviolet bad.”

That was the core message that came out of the introduction Tuesday morning of the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer at a meeting held at the National Press Club in Washington DC.

There were some other messages that now raise skin cancer awareness and prevention high on the public health awareness list, such as the fact that over 5 million people every year have a diagnosis of skin cancer (and many have more than one skin cancer), and that we are spending over $8 billion dollars treating the disease. But most important is the fact that this is one of the most preventable cancers, and if current trends are any indication we are not getting the job done when it comes to decreasing the number of skin cancers and saving lives. [more]

Acting Surgeon General Boris Lushniak MD and Assistant Secretary for Health Howard Koh MD were masterful presenting the evidence contained in the report, and … Continue reading →

“Don’t Fry Day” Reminds Us To Take Care Of Our Skin Since It’s The Only One We Get

“Don’t Fry Day,” which we “celebrate” every year on the Friday before Memorial Day is an annual reminder to be good to the skin you’re in. It’s the only one you get. Wear it out or damage it and you don’t get to replace it, like we do with heart valves, knees, hips, and so on.

This year Don’t Fry Day is even more personal to me. After hounding all of you to be careful in the sun, I got a very personal reminder this past year of why that’s important: two surgeries and two scars from removing skin cancers. One of those scars is pretty visible and a daily reminder of my own past unwise sun behavior. Like many folks, I’m glad the cancer is gone. But I also wish it hadn’t been there in the first place.

The reality is that my generation had very little knowledge and very few options when it came to avoiding the dangers of too much sun exposure. We went outdoors, we went to the beach, we didn’t have sunscreen, and we just lay there and took it. We thought we looked good. If we worked outdoors–like I did when I was … Continue reading →

One Doctor’s Confession: Basal And Squamous Cell Skin Cancers Are NOT Benign

I have made a resolution for 2014: I will never, never, never again call basal and squamous skin cancers “benign” cancers.

Why would I make such a strange commitment? The explanation is simple:  I spent 4 hours on New Year’s Eve sitting in the surgeon’s chair getting a skin cancer taken off my nose. Nothing about the experience fits the “benign” label so many professionals, including yours truly, have used:  routine; easy to treat; nothing to worry about.  Friends, after this experience, which left me looking like a tall, white-haired Rudolph the Reindeer, I am here to tell you these cancers are not to be trifled with, and are worth every effort you can make at preventing them by reducing exposure to UV radiation. [more]

This was the second time in the past 6 months that I had surgery for one of these “benign” cancers. The first time was difficult enough (see my earlier post), so when I saw a small growth that progressed over time, I made it a point to get to the dermatologist to get it removed. He did. That part was fairly simple. But a week later I got the call: “You need to … Continue reading →

During Breast Cancer Awareness Month We Must Not Only Celebrate Success, But Reflect On Our Limitations As Well

I find myself sitting here to write a blog in recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness month, and frankly it’s not as easy as I anticipated. And I am asking myself why that is.

 

We have made considerable progress in the early detection of breast cancer. I have commented frequently about the differences in breast cancer detection, treatment and survival today and when I started my medical training and career in the 1970’s.

 

Early detection is clearly a success story if the measure of success is whether or not we can find breast cancer when it is “small” in most women. Our technology lets us do that with mammography techniques that are far more accurate and sophisticated than they were a few decades ago. Much of our discussion today centers around what role newer approaches, such as MRI, ultrasound, and most recently 3-D mammography have in early detection of breast cancer.

 

Our treatments are much more refined than they were in 1970, as well. We now have lumpectomy and radiation as a valid replacement for many mastectomies. We have sentinel node biopsy instead of axillary node dissection, which for some women adds nothing but long term misery caused … Continue reading →

During Breast Cancer Awareness Month We Must Not Only Celebrate Our Success But Also Understand Our Limitations

I find myself sitting here to write a blog in recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness month, and frankly it’s not as easy as I anticipated. And I am asking myself why that is.

 

We have made considerable progress in the early detection of breast cancer. I have commented frequently about the differences in breast cancer detection, treatment and survival today and when I started my medical training and career in the 1970’s.

 

Early detection is clearly a success story if the measure of success is whether or not we can find breast cancer when it is “small” in most women. Our technology lets us do that with mammography techniques that are far more accurate and sophisticated than they were a few decades ago. Much of our discussion today centers around what role newer approaches, such as MRI, ultrasound, and most recently 3-D mammography have in early detection of breast cancer.

 

Our treatments are much more refined than they were in 1970, as well. We now have lumpectomy and radiation as a valid replacement for many mastectomies. We have sentinel node biopsy instead of axillary node dissection, which for some women adds nothing but long term misery caused … Continue reading →

A Personal Reflection On Lance Armstrong: A Moment In Time, A Powerful Commitment To Cancer Research and Survivorship

Like many of you, I have been reading the various news stories about Lance Armstrong, especially one this past weekend in a major newspaper, which went into great detail about the allegations surrounding Lance Armstrong’s cycling career.

 

But what I didn’t see in all of that coverage was much mention of the other side of the man, the side that I witnessed up close and personal one Friday in Texas a couple of years ago, the side that has led me to share my thoughts with you today.

 

I saw something that day that I had never-let me repeat, never-seen before. It was a moment that has forever influenced my opinion of Mr. Armstrong, even as these various charges have swirled about him these past couple of years. And the impression it created was indelible.

 

I am not here to hash/rehash the incriminations. I am here to stand up and say that no matter what the truth is regarding the allegations, this is a man who has forever changed the cancer landscape for millions of people in this country and around the world. This is a man who lent his prestige and his personal power to a … Continue reading →

Want To Reduce Your Risk Of Cancer? Go Take A Walk

I have a confession to make:

 

As soon as I finished reading the Annual Report to the Nation yesterday as I was preparing to write my blog, I got up from my desk and took a walk for 20 minutes.

 

What, might you ask, compelled me to do this?

 

The answer is what made me take a walk is the same reason I am writing this follow-up commentary to yesterday’s blog: Sitting at my desk all day may kill me. It may be doing the same for you. [more]

 

I don’t know how many of us are aware that physical inactivity-apart from being overweight or obese-is an independent risk factor for cancer. In plain terms, you may think you are healthy because your body weight is normal, but in reality you may be one of those folks who also sit at a desk like I do for 8-10 or more hours a day, or spend your life traveling in cars and airplanes. If you are, then your risk of cancer is increased, independent of how much you weigh. And there are now suggestions that even engaging in vigorous physical activity doesn’t mitigate the adverse impact … Continue reading →