Monthly Archives: January 2020

Are Sunscreens Safe? FDA Studies Suggest Its Time We Get Answers

Are sunscreens safe?

That’s the question that will be on the minds of many as the Food and Drug Administration releases a second study on the absorption of sunscreens. The reality is that answering the “safe” question is becoming more complicated—and more important as well, given the fact that so many of us use sunscreens as part of our own sun safety efforts, while others (me included) use sunscreen as part of our daily routine.

Despite the questions raised in this study, the FDA concludes:

“These findings do not indicate that individuals should refrain from the use of sunscreen.” (Emphasis mine)

It is a difficult balancing act pitting product safety up against the prevention of some very nasty cancers. It leaves many consumers and experts in the midst of a quandary of what to do and what to recommend.… Continue reading →

What Can We Do To Lessen Financial Hardship As A Side Effect Of Cancer Care?

A cancer diagnosis can create almost unfathomable change to a person’s life. It can literally threaten our very being. And somehow, we live in a world in which we let this random, tragic occurrence exact profound cost in financial stability, only adding to the distress.

That is the message of a research report published by my colleagues at the American Cancer Society on the topic of financial hardship and sacrifice associated with cancer care in the United States.… Continue reading →

Remember Last January’s Promise Of A Cure For Cancer In A Year? Heard Anything Lately?

Remember this from a year ago in the Jerusalem Post?

“We believe we will offer in a year’s time a complete cure for cancer…Our cancer cure will be effective from day one, will last a duration of a few weeks and will have no or minimal side-effects at a much lower cost than most other treatments on the market…Our solution will be both generic and personal.”

Well it’s been a year. Haven’t heard anything? Well, you are not alone. Maybe it will come tomorrow (everything is possible, however not likely). Unfortunately–especially for cancer patients, their loved ones, and in fact all of us who cling to the hope every day that such a cure would be discovered–there isn’t anything I could find to suggest the investigators were able to deliver.… Continue reading →

The American Cancer Society’s 2020 Cancer Statistics Report: Remarkable Progress And Opportunities To Do Even Better

The American Cancer Society’s annual report on cancer statistics has been published, and it brings with it more “good news” about the progress against cancer. However, there are also some notable areas of concern that should lead us to reinforce our focus on what we need to do to continue to reduce the burden and suffering from cancer in the United States—and make even more progress.

The good news is that the decline in the rate of deaths from cancer continues to improve: from 1991 (when the cancer death rate in this country was at its peak) until 2017 (the most recent year for which data is available) there was a decline of 29% in the cancer death rate. That translates into 2.9 million fewer deaths from cancer than would have been expected had the rate of cancer deaths not changed from 1991.

And while all most other non-cancer related causes of deaths were increasing or remaining stable, the rate of deaths from cancer declined by a remarkable 2.2% from 2016 to 2017, continuing a long string of declines over many years. This was in fact the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality since rates began falling in the early … Continue reading →

`No progress in cancer care? Really?

`No progress in cancer care? Really?

That’s the question I am struggling with following an interview I did with a radio network last week, and which will likely be released a couple of weeks from now. I was asked to respond to the premise offered by a book author who is a well-known professor at a major academic medical center, exclaiming that our treatment for cancer is based on “Slash, burn and poison” and that our cancer research efforts are currently substantially misdirected.

Instead, the professor says, we should admit that we have not made meaningful progress in treating cancer, and that our research is too directed to the end of the cancer cycle (namely a couple of months improvement in life expectancy for those with cancer) and in fact should be focused on the “first cell.”

It’s a refrain I have heard before, as early as my beginning engagement in treating patients with cancer in the 1970s. “Slash, burn and poison”—or similar words—were legion at that time. Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy were toxic, had substantial side effects, often ineffective and not offering much hope beyond a small number of cancers such as Hodgkin Disease which was showing excellent responses … Continue reading →