Monthly Archives: June 2019

Cancer And The “Cure”

Words have meaning. And when it comes to cancer, especially advanced cancer, there aren’t many words that have more meaning than the word “cure.” Yet it is that very word and concept that is top of mind for some of us these days.

We clinicians are guilty as charged when it comes to reluctance declaring those who have had a remarkable response to treatments for advanced cancer “cured.” Experience has taught us over decades that we have misused the word and overpromised those we cared for. Our patients and loved ones have paid a price for our over optimism. Consequently, our culture has taught us to avoid the word, lest we be shown to have been less-than-truthful when a cancer returns with a vengeance.

And yet our world is changing: we are now seeing long term responses to treatments in diseases where until recently we had little hope of such success.

Recent reports of rapidly declining mortality in melanoma, normal life spans for many people treated for previously fatal diseases like chronic myelogenous leukemia, and the potential for impressive gains in outcomes for people with lung cancer are but a few examples that suggest we are indeed in … Continue reading →

A Plea For A Focus On The Humanity Of Cancer Care: Are We Missing An Opportunity When It Comes To Artificial Intelligence?

Yesterday I wrote about emerging themes at the ongoing annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here in Chicago. That blog was about lung cancer, and the reality that the time has come to aggressively address our failures to improve outcomes for those at risk of lung cancer and those diagnosed with the disease.

Today I want to share some thoughts about another theme: artificial intelligence, or as I prefer to call it “data analytics.” Fundamentally: how can we capture the capability of analytics to improve the care and outcomes of cancer patients? And more importantly: how can we harness this technology to help bring back the human touch in cancer care?

Admittedly that’s a large focus covering lots of opportunities. Speak to one expert and you will get one idea of how analytics could improve care. Speak to another and you will get another entirely different view of what that means and how we should be using our rapidly advancing capabilities to harness machines and their capacity to learn and engage health care, specifically cancer care.

My real concern is that there are so many sophisticated opportunities to choose from that we may be missing some … Continue reading →

What Will It Take To Shake The Tree And Save More Lives From Lung Cancer: A Report From ASCO 2019

Every year, the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology is unmatched in bringing forward the latest advances in cancer care. It is a time to learn about important—and usually– incremental advances in cancer research and cancer care, and every year has some of us, especially those of us with some years under our belts, thinking about big picture themes in cancer: where we’ve been, where we are, and where we’re going.

For me, today’s theme is lung cancer and the sad fact that our care for those at high risk and those  diagnosed with the disease is far from what it should be. But more than I ever, I am convinced the future holds hope.… Continue reading →