Category Archives: Tobacco/Smoking

New Year, New You: Cancer.org Can Help

Hand on a Scale

It’s that time of year again. The time when many of us set new goals, start positive lifestyle changes, or seek to improve our lives in one way or another. Whether you choose to make a New Year’s resolution or not – now is a great time to take a look at your health and habits and think about what you could be doing better.

But sometimes it is hard to know where to start. Cancer.org offers a wealth of information to help you be healthy. Here’s a roundup of our 10 most popular health and wellness articles to get you going:

  1. If you’re trying to quit smoking: Kicking the habit is hard. But our guide to quitting smoking walks you through all you need to know about how to successfully stop.
  1. If you’re working on cutting calories: Eating the right amount of nutritious foods can help you get to and stay at a healthy weight – which is important to your overall health and can help prevent cancer. Use our calorie counter tool to get an estimate of how many calories you need.
  1. If you’re looking for motivation to lose weight: If you are trying to lose weight this year and need some extra motivation, review our information about how being overweight or obese can raise your risk for certain types of cancer.
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Smokers: Make the Choice to Improve Your Life Today

By Cliff Douglas, JD

Stopping smoking is hard. For many smokers, it may take multiple tries to break the addiction for good. And often, getting support from friends, family, and experts is what smokers need to make the life-saving choice to quit.

That’s why the American Cancer Society gives extra inspiration to smokers nationwide each year through its Great American Smokeout – a day when smokers are encouraged to quit for the day and make a plan to quit for good.

Quitting even for one day is an important step towards a smoke-free life, but even that can prove difficult.

As someone who has been in the fight against tobacco for more than 25 years, I have seen just how challenging it can be for smokers to quit. I have helped pass laws making airplanes smoke-free, worked to defend local smoke-free restaurant and workplace laws, and consulted to United States government leaders about what more we as a nation can do to put an end to the harms of tobacco use.

But even with all of the progress we have made, for those who smoke, quitting is still a hard-fought battle to win. Some people are able to quit on their own, without the help of others or the use of medicines.… Continue reading →

World No Tobacco Day is about Driving Down Tobacco Use

By Jeffrey Drope, PhD

May 31 is World No Tobacco Day, an important annual event when we pause to reflect on how to move the world away from tobacco use and toward improved public health.  

Tobacco is one of the leading risk factors for non-communicable diseases, including cancer – 32% of all cancer deaths in the United States, including a staggering 87% of lung cancer deaths, are attributable to tobacco use. Tobacco use is also one of the most preventable causes of cancer deaths.  

This year’s World No Tobacco Day theme is illicit trade – tobacco products produced, exported, imported, purchased, sold, or possessed illegally. While illicit trade in tobacco products is undoubtedly troubling from a number of perspectives, including lost tax revenue for governments, increased revenue to tobacco companies, and links to organized crime and possibly terrorism, it’s important to look at the whole picture. The tobacco industry consistently tries to claim that strong tobacco control policies increase illicit trade. But, in fact, the single best way to fight the illicit trade in tobacco products is to redouble efforts to use what we already know works to drive down the use of all cigarettes, legal and illegal.… Continue reading →

Celebrating 25 Years of Smoke-Free Airplanes

By John R. Seffrin, PhD

Twenty-five years after a federal law passed banning smoking on all domestic flights, many of us don’t even notice the lit “No Smoking” sign above our airplane seats. Until that landmark public health legislation took effect on February 25, 1990, flight attendants were subjected to deadly secondhand smoke during every flight and travelers who sat in “non-smoking” sections couldn’t escape the fumes.

As a member of the American Cancer Society National Board of Directors 25 years ago, I agreed it was imperative for the Society to utilize its scientific expertise and passionate volunteer base to counteract the tobacco industry and protect non-smokers and flight attendants from the hazardous effects of secondhand smoke on every flight. We had the evidence to prove that smoke-free laws saved lives, so we decided to take the issue to Capitol Hill. The Society and its public health partners had champions in Senators Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ), whose unwavering support was instrumental in passing the legislation. (You can hear more about Senator Durbin’s involvement in this video.)

The smoke-free airplanes legislation sparked a nationwide movement in support of smoke-free workplaces. In 2002, Delaware became the first state to enact a comprehensive smoke-free law covering all workplaces, including bars and restaurants.… Continue reading →

Continuing to smoke after a cancer diagnosis

By J. Lee Westmaas, PhD

While the American Cancer Society and other organizations traditionally focus on getting smokers to quit before they develop cancer, there’s a group of smokers who are especially susceptible to the negative effects of smoking. They are cancer survivors – some of whom have been diagnosed with a smoking-related cancer. It’s easy to say, “If you get cancer, then you should know better and quit, and stay quit,” but that’s not the whole story.

Getting a cancer diagnosis does motivate some smokers to quit. Using data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II, we found that about 1 out of 3 smokers quit smoking when they were diagnosed with cancer. That compares with only 1 out of 5 smokers who quit but were not diagnosed with cancer during the same time periods studied.

Even smokers whose cancer was not strongly linked to smoking (like breast cancer) quit at higher rates than undiagnosed smokers. These results were not caused by the smokers being unable to smoke due to their illness; those people were excluded from the study.

Smoking: Risky for patients and survivors

Quitting is particularly important for cancer patients and survivors because smoking can increase the likelihood of a recurrence, delay wound healing, and make cancer treatments less effective.… Continue reading →

Are lung cancer breath tests more than hot air?

By Ted Gansler, MD, MBA, MPH

Can breath tests (like those used to check whether drivers have been drinking alcohol) be used for lung cancer screening? Or, is this (pardon the pun) just a lot of “hot air?” Although breath tests for lung cancer are “not ready for prime time,” there has been some encouraging research.

There are 3 main ways to fight cancer – prevention, screening, and treatment. Although lung cancer remains the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide and in the United States, researchers are making progress against this disease on all 3 fronts. 

Over nearly a half century, researchers tried several tests for lung cancer screening, none of which were accurate enough for widespread use. Because of research results released in 2010, the American Cancer Society and several other organizations now recommend that people at high risk for lung cancer (certain groups of current and former smokers) ask their doctor about CT scans for lung cancer screening.

On average, people in these high risk groups who have this test every year according to the ACS guidelines can reduce their risk of dying from lung cancer by about 20%. This can save a lot of lives and prevent a lot of suffering, so if you are a current or former smoker, you should read more about our lung cancer screening recommendations.… Continue reading →

Can we predict who will become addicted to cigarettes?

By Victoria Stevens, PhD

Every day in the United States, nearly 4,000 young people under the age of 18 smoke their first cigarette, according to the Centers for Disease Control’s Youth and Tobacco Use Fact Sheet. About 1,000 of these kids will go on to become daily smokers, which is the next step on the pathway to becoming addicted to nicotine. Over the course of a year, that is 365,000 new daily smokers. About 60%, or almost 220,000, will still be regular smokers 7 to 9 years later. 

When they tried that first cigarette, did they expect to become dependent on nicotine and unable to quit smoking whenever they want to? Of course not, because they feel young and invincible. In fact, only 3% of the regular smokers expected to be still smoking 5 years later. 

Is nicotine addiction in our genes?

A paper published in JAMA Psychiatry may give some clues to why so many young people continue smoking after that first try. Please note: the research is preliminary, and much more needs to be done before any conclusions are reached and recommendations made. But it’s also intriguing. [more]

A group of scientists from the United States, the United Kingdom, and New Zealand used genetics to identify which smokers are likely to become addicted.… Continue reading →

E-Cigarettes – It’s Complicated

By Thomas J. Glynn, PhD

Editor’s note: This blog is the last one frequent contributor Dr. Glynn will write before his upcoming retirement. We wanted to thank him for his expertise and ability to break down a topic and offer insight, as well as his excellent writing. We offer him best wishes for a long, happy retirement.

In May 2011, I had the opportunity to write the first Expert Voices blog on what was then a new, but growing, public health concern – the emergence of e-cigarettes.

At that time, I wrote that “e-cigarettes have been described both as a miracle answer to the devastating effects of cigarette smoking and as a grave danger to the public health;” that they “are a source of controversy;” and that we need “to put science to work (and) obtain, solid, independent data” regarding e-cigarettes.

Now, 3 years later, more than 1,000 research papers, commentaries, and opinion pieces have been published about e-cigarettes. There’s been continuous public debate about and media attention paid to e-cigarettes, and there’s a proposed FDA rule regarding e-cigarette regulation.

Now, it is finally possible, at long last, to say that… e-cigarettes continue to be described both as a miracle answer to the devastating effects of cigarette smoking and as a grave danger to the public health; that they remain a source of controversy; and that more independent, objective data are needed.… Continue reading →

The Landmark Surgeon General Report on Smoking and Health, 50 Years Later

By Richard C. Wender, MD

 

Fifty years ago, on January 11, 1964, Luther Terry held a press conference to announce the results of the first Surgeon General’s report on smoking and health, the most impactful public health document in history. The report laid to rest over a decade of debate about the health risks of smoking by definitively stating that smoking causes lung and laryngeal cancer in men, chronic bronchitis, and other diseases.

Research conducted by the American Cancer Society and other groups had already demonstrated the adverse health effects of smoking, but, until the Surgeon General’s report, the tobacco industry had been successful in hiding the truth. The extraordinary methods used by the Surgeon General to ensure that the report was completely unbiased — including allowing the tobacco industry to veto nominees to serve on the panel — the thoroughness of the research, and the clarity of the conclusions, all led to one outcome: the end of the debate about the health risks of smoking and the launch of the true fight to end the use of tobacco products. The progress in the tobacco fight over the past 50 years represents one of the most successful, life-saving public health campaigns in our nation’s history.… Continue reading →

What really works to help you quit and avoid tobacco?

By Thomas J. Glynn, PhD

The American Cancer Society’s first Great American Smokeout was celebrated November 18, 1976. Gerald R. Ford was President of the United States, the “War on Cancer” had begun just a few years before, Barack Obama was 15 years old and, according to a Gallup Poll taken that year, 37% of American adults smoked cigarettes.

This year, the 37th anniversary of that first Great American Smokeout, the percentage of Americans who smoke has nearly been cut in half, to 19%. And, those who do smoke use far fewer cigarettes than in 1976, from about 4,000 cigarettes per year for every U.S. adult then, to about 1,200 now.

Certainly, we know that any cigarette smoking is dangerous to the smoker and non-smokers who inhale cigarette smoke. We also know that far too many Americans continue to smoke – 44 million, at last count. Still, astounding progress has been made in combatting what is the nation’s largest cause of preventable death and disability.

How do we know what works?

How was such progress made? What actions were taken to achieve such significant changes in the face of the tobacco industry’s relentless, illegal, and well-funded efforts to addict men, women, and children to their deadly products?… Continue reading →