Monthly Archives: February 2015

Celebrating 25 Years of Smoke-Free Airplanes

By John R. Seffrin, PhD

Twenty-five years after a federal law passed banning smoking on all domestic flights, many of us don’t even notice the lit “No Smoking” sign above our airplane seats. Until that landmark public health legislation took effect on February 25, 1990, flight attendants were subjected to deadly secondhand smoke during every flight and travelers who sat in “non-smoking” sections couldn’t escape the fumes.

As a member of the American Cancer Society National Board of Directors 25 years ago, I agreed it was imperative for the Society to utilize its scientific expertise and passionate volunteer base to counteract the tobacco industry and protect non-smokers and flight attendants from the hazardous effects of secondhand smoke on every flight. We had the evidence to prove that smoke-free laws saved lives, so we decided to take the issue to Capitol Hill. The Society and its public health partners had champions in Senators Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ), whose unwavering support was instrumental in passing the legislation. (You can hear more about Senator Durbin’s involvement in this video.)

The smoke-free airplanes legislation sparked a nationwide movement in support of smoke-free workplaces. In 2002, Delaware became the first state to enact a comprehensive smoke-free law covering all workplaces, including bars and restaurants.… Continue reading →

Palliative care is part of good cancer care

By Diane E. Meier, M.D., FACP

Deborah, a 36-year-old mother of two young children, was diagnosed with breast cancer 2 years ago, and the disease has metastasized (spread) to her bones. The pain is severe, making it hard to care for her children or get to work.

Like any young mother, Deborah is determined to fight her cancer and be present for her son and daughter as they grow up. Deborah’s oncologists, doctors at the top of their field, are intensely focused on controlling her cancer and identifying the chemotherapy plans that are most likely to work for her. But they have been unable to manage Deborah’s pain. It had become so bad that she was unable to sleep or eat, spending much of the day curled on her side in bed. She missed a course of chemotherapy because of her pain, and she had to hire outside help to get her kids to and from school.

Deborah’s long-time internist finally referred her to the palliative care team at her local hospital. They prescribed a low-dose opioid medicine and within 2 days, Deborah’s pain was well controlled, she was up and around, sleeping and eating, and back to normal life with her family.… Continue reading →