Monthly Archives: January 2015

Less Food Marketing, Healthier Children

By Colleen Doyle, MS, RD

Have you seen all those fun and flashy commercials encouraging your kids to eat more fruits and vegetables? No? Neither have I. And there’s a reason for that. 

Out of the $1.79 billion that the Federal Trade Commission says major food and beverage companies spent marketing foods and beverages to kids and teens (in 2009 – the most recent data available), less than .05% was spent marketing fruits and vegetables. Unfortunately for those of us who care about children’s health – which I hope is all of us – the majority of those dollars was spent on marketing unhealthy foods and beverages. Forty percent was spent to market fast food and other restaurant foods, and another 22% was spent promoting high-sugar sodas and other carbonated beverages.

And consider these additional statistics:

  • Two BILLION advertisements for foods and drinks appeared on websites directed at kids in 2009, mostly for sugary cereals and fast food.
  • Dollars spent to market foods and drinks to kids via online games, mobile apps, social network ads, and other digital media increased by 51% from 2006 to 2009.
  • Companies spent $149 MILLION in 2009 to market sugary drinks and food in schools.
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Chemo 101: What you need to know

By Agnes Beasley, MSN, RN, OCN

“What should I expect from chemotherapy?” 

I’ve heard those very words spoken by newly diagnosed cancer patients on many occasions in my extensive oncology nursing career. It’s normal for a newly diagnosed patient to try to make sense of what is happening to them. Questions swirl like a tornado in a cancer patient’s mind. You may feel that way right now. Some of the questions you may have are:

  • What can I expect on the day of chemotherapy (chemo)?
  • What can I expect when I go home after chemo?
  • What happens in the “chemo room?”
  • How long will it take to get my chemo?
  • Can I have someone with me during chemo to keep me company?
  • What am I allowed to bring with me to keep me busy?
  • Is it okay to sleep?
  • Will there be other people getting treatment around me or can I be in a private room?
  • I’m feeling anxious, overwhelmed, upset, and angry. Is what I’m feeling normal?
  • If I have questions, who do I call for the answers? [more]

Oncology nurses in the chemotherapy suite get these types of questions on a daily basis. You may be thinking we’re too busy to answer your questions, but don’t worry, ask.… Continue reading →