Monthly Archives: November 2014

Continuing to smoke after a cancer diagnosis

By J. Lee Westmaas, PhD

While the American Cancer Society and other organizations traditionally focus on getting smokers to quit before they develop cancer, there’s a group of smokers who are especially susceptible to the negative effects of smoking. They are cancer survivors – some of whom have been diagnosed with a smoking-related cancer. It’s easy to say, “If you get cancer, then you should know better and quit, and stay quit,” but that’s not the whole story.

Getting a cancer diagnosis does motivate some smokers to quit. Using data from the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study-II, we found that about 1 out of 3 smokers quit smoking when they were diagnosed with cancer. That compares with only 1 out of 5 smokers who quit but were not diagnosed with cancer during the same time periods studied.

Even smokers whose cancer was not strongly linked to smoking (like breast cancer) quit at higher rates than undiagnosed smokers. These results were not caused by the smokers being unable to smoke due to their illness; those people were excluded from the study.

Smoking: Risky for patients and survivors

Quitting is particularly important for cancer patients and survivors because smoking can increase the likelihood of a recurrence, delay wound healing, and make cancer treatments less effective.… Continue reading →

Are lung cancer breath tests more than hot air?

By Ted Gansler, MD, MBA, MPH

Can breath tests (like those used to check whether drivers have been drinking alcohol) be used for lung cancer screening? Or, is this (pardon the pun) just a lot of “hot air?” Although breath tests for lung cancer are “not ready for prime time,” there has been some encouraging research.

There are 3 main ways to fight cancer – prevention, screening, and treatment. Although lung cancer remains the leading cause of death from cancer worldwide and in the United States, researchers are making progress against this disease on all 3 fronts. 

Over nearly a half century, researchers tried several tests for lung cancer screening, none of which were accurate enough for widespread use. Because of research results released in 2010, the American Cancer Society and several other organizations now recommend that people at high risk for lung cancer (certain groups of current and former smokers) ask their doctor about CT scans for lung cancer screening.

On average, people in these high risk groups who have this test every year according to the ACS guidelines can reduce their risk of dying from lung cancer by about 20%. This can save a lot of lives and prevent a lot of suffering, so if you are a current or former smoker, you should read more about our lung cancer screening recommendations.… Continue reading →