Monthly Archives: September 2014

Adults Need Vaccines, Too

By William Schaffner, MD

As I like to tell my patients, the best approach to everyday health is a proactive one, and that means staying up-to-date on recommended vaccinations in addition to annual checkups.

Many adults don’t visit a doctor unless they feel ill, nor do they think about vaccination as part of their routine, preventive healthcare. This leaves them needlessly vulnerable to diseases that can cause severe health complications or even death. 

Vaccines are a safe, effective way to help prevent a number of diseases at any age-from 6 months to 60 years, and beyond. In fact, there are several vaccines recommended specifically for adults because of their risk for certain infections.

It’s important for all adults to check with a healthcare professional about which vaccines are recommended for them, as we all need some vaccinations as we age. For example, the chance of having complications from the flu, or getting shingles or pneumococcal disease (see below for more information) increases with age. In other cases, a weakened immune system or the presence of underlying illnesses like cancer, heart disease, or diabetes can make us more susceptible to diseases.

Many adult vaccines are readily available at primary care medical offices and in pharmacies, and the cost of vaccination is usually covered by Medicare and most private insurers.… Continue reading →

After Prostate Cancer Treatment Ends

By Rebecca Cowens-Alvarado, MPH

According to the American Cancer Society, there are nearly 3 million prostate cancer survivors in the United States today and this number is expected to increase to almost 4.2 million by 2024.  Most prostate cancers (93%) are diagnosed at the local or regional stage, before the cancer has spread to surrounding organs. Treatment at these early stages is often very successful, and the 5-year relative survival rate approaches 100%.

Treatments for prostate cancer patients vary based on age and stage of diagnosis, but the majority of prostate cancer patients younger than aged 65 are more likely to be treated with radiation, radical prostatectomy, or a combination of both. Some patients may also be treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), while others may simply undergo active surveillance, or “watchful waiting,” to see how the prostate cancer progresses before choosing a treatment option. While the survival rate for prostate cancer is high, being diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer may cause a number of physical, psychological, and social side effects that can last (or develop) long after treatment ends.

Common issues faced by prostate cancer survivors who underwent surgery or radiation include: difficulty having an erection and decreased interest in sex, which may impact sexual intimacy; needing to urinate quickly or not being able to control when they urinate; bowel problems such as not being able to control or having diarrhea; and distress or depression.… Continue reading →