Monthly Archives: March 2014

What to keep in mind when you see STUDIES SAY

By Alvaro Carrascal, MD, MPH

You may have seen some of these headlines recently in national newspapers and online:

More coffee linked to higher mortality rate: study

Four cups of coffee a day may raise early death risk in younger adults

4 Cups of Coffee a Day Can Be Deadly

New Study: Coffee Can Kill You

Under 55? Think twice before you reach for that extra cup of coffee, researchers say

After seeing these reports on the web and morning news, I had a thought as I reached for my morning cup of joe: Should I consider tea instead?

As a person who grew up drinking 2-3 cups of coffee a day, should I change my habits based on these news reports? What would happen if I don’t? Should these reports stop my life-long friendship with Juan Valdez? [more]

Then, I began to recall headlines from a few months ago.

Caffeine Linked to Lower Skin Cancer Risk

Moderate Coffee Consumption Lowers Heart Failure Risk

Moderate Coffee Consumption May Reduce Risk of Diabetes by Up to 25 Percent

What should we make of these contradictory reports? Who is right, who is wrong, and what should we believe?

Every day we are bombarded with reports about studies and occasionally these studies contradict each other.… Continue reading →

A national effort to help end colon cancer

By Richard C. Wender, MD

About a year ago, U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Howard Koh, MD, invited a small group of people to his office to discuss the opportunity for the nation to start a full court press to end colorectal (colon) cancer as a major public health problem in the United States. The meeting idea came from a conversation on his back porch with his college friend Ron Vender, MD, who had just been elected President of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). Howard asked Ron how he could most effectively work with the ACG and, together, they decided that it was the right time to tackle colon cancer in a big way.

Dr. Koh invited leaders of the organizations that were at the center of public health efforts to increase colon cancer screening rates to attend the meeting. Screening is looking for cancer in people who have no symptoms of the disease. In the case of colon cancer, screening can find the disease at an early, more treatable stage, and it can also prevent it altogether. This is because colon cancer screening tests often find polyps, which can then be removed before they have a chance to become cancerous.… Continue reading →

International Women’s Day, a Chance for Change

By Ambassador Sally G. Cowal


We celebrate International Women’s Day March 8. Originally, it was an event to promote equal political rights, including the right to vote, for women. As a Chicagoan I’m proud to say that one of the earliest Women’s Day observances was held in that city in 1908!

Today, although women have the right to vote almost everywhere, health inequalities and disparities between women in the developed and developing worlds — and between men and women in many countries and regions of the world — continue to exist.

Women’s health is important, not only for women, but for men and for families. Women are the caregivers in most places in the world, and when a woman is ill or dies prematurely, her family -particularly her children – carry the burden.  That is one of the reasons why it is so important to prevent premature illness and death in women from cancer. Although we think of cancer as a disease that affects people in high income countries, the reality is that 57% of cancer cases and 65% of cancer deaths are in low and middle income countries – that is 5.3 million deaths a year.  And the trends point to a continuing shift of the burden to lower income countries.… Continue reading →