Monthly Archives: August 2012

Can Removing Fallopian Tubes Prevent Cancer ?

By Debbie Saslow, PhD

 

I’ve seen a few articles recently about removing the fallopian tubes to prevent ovarian cancer, a procedure called “prophylactic bilateral salpingectomy”. And not just in women who are at high risk for ovarian cancer, which is already recommended by gynecological medical societies in the United States, but for all women who are not planning to have any more children and who are about to undergo abdominal surgery for any reason.

I can see the appeal given that many, if not most, ovarian cancers actually originate in the fallopian tubes. In fact, it is more common to find microscopic fallopian tube cancer than microscopic ovarian cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation when they have their ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. (These mutations put them at higher risk for ovarian and breast cancer.) And unfortunately we don’t yet have an accurate test to screen women for ovarian cancer, so these cancers are usually found at a late stage when they are often fatal. 

It is common for women to get their “tubes tied” (i.e. tubal ligation) as a form of permanent birth control, and we know this reduces the risk of ovarian cancer. But removing the fallopian tubes is a more invasive procedure, and the potential benefits and potential harms are largely unknown.… Continue reading →

Cancer Drugs: Long Odds and Magic Bullets

By William C. Phelps, PhD

 

During 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved 30 completely new therapies (new molecular entities, as opposed to the modification of an old drug), 7 of which were for treatment of different types of cancer.  One of them, the lung cancer drug crizotinib, was decades in the making. For a new drug, that isn’t necessarily a lot of time.

Why does it take so long to get cancer treatments to the patients who need them? The answer lies both in the complexity of cancer and the complexity of the drug development and testing process. [more]

 

Seeking a ‘magic bullet’

A documentary film was released in 2006 called Penicillin: The Magic Bullet and it told the story of the remarkable discovery of what many consider medicine’s first great drug, which saved thousands of lives at the end of the Second World War. Penicillin was a magic bullet because it was extraordinarily safe and magically effective at killing bacteria that often caused lethal infections on the battlefield and beyond. 

It was within this context of hopeful expectations that cancer drug discovery got its start in the 1940s to find the magic bullet to kill cancer cells.… Continue reading →

The Bottom Line on Soy and Breast Cancer Risk

By Marji McCullough, ScD, RD

 

EDITOR’S NOTE: Dr. McCullough added the following statement 4/8/14 in response to questions related to sources of isoflavones:

Research on soy and cancer is highly complex, controversial, and evolving.

When concerns about soy are raised, they generally focus on findings from rodent models of cancer which tend to use isolated soy compounds like soy protein isolate or high doses of isoflavones (compounds found in soy).  However, soy is metabolized differently in humans than it is in mice and rats, so findings in rodents may not apply to people. (See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16614407 for more on this.)(Setchell, AJCN, 2011).  There is no evidence in the medical literature that soy protein isolate is bad for humans, compared to other forms of soy. Soy protein isolate is often used as a supplement in randomized studies of the effects of soy on health and none of these studies have shown harm.

Most of the studies suggesting benefits of soy consumption in people have measured how much soy foods people are eating, including tofu, soybeans, and soy milk.  These foods are more commonly eaten in Asian countries. In the U.S., purified forms of soy are used in the food supply, including in energy bars and soy hot dogs.  The few US studies that have measured these forms of soy do not suggest harm.Continue reading →