Tobacco

Mark Cuban Asked And I Respond: Will This Company Transform The Economics and Results of Healthcare?

It’s not often you are asked publicly to comment on a particular investment by an entrepreneur as well-known as Mark Cuban. And although I don’t usually offer such advice, this one piqued my interest—more so because of a larger story than the particular company itself.

Mr. Cuban wrote that he is “really excited about changing the economics and results of healthcare with this one.” I don’t doubt his sincerity, however may I suggest there are some much bigger problems that need to be addressed to meet that noble transformative and audacious goal?

The company in question is called LungDirect. They offer a program that gathers information on CT scans performed for the early detection of lung cancer, analyzes the data and facilitates reports required by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for payment under the Medicare program (more about that below). In short, it’s a sophisticated approach to what we call a “medical registry.”

I can’t comment here nor do I know whether their tool is any better or any worse than other similar programs. What I do know is that although registry reporting can be complex, creating technology that assists in tracking patients, collating, … Continue reading →

We Can Find Lung Cancer Early And Save Lives, So Why Aren’t More Smokers And Former Smokers Getting Screened?

In 2011 with much fanfare the National Cancer Institute announced that lung cancer screening decreased deaths from lung cancer by 20%. In 2013, the American Cancer Society (among other organizations) published well-thought-out guidelines recommending high quality screening along with shared decision making so eligible patients could understand the risks and benefits of screening. In 2015 the Medicare program announced that lung cancer screening would be covered, along with the shared decision component.

With all of that evidence and support, one would think that lung cancer screening would see rapid uptake in the United States in an effort to reduce deaths from this all-too-frequent cause of cancer death.

If you thought that, you would be wrong. So the logical question is why? In the face of all this evidence, why are high risk current and smokers not being screened, and how do we make it right?

That question is the result of a spate of recent articles (links 1,2,3) in journals from the American Medical Association, along with a somewhat “direct” editorial that highlights the need to better understand how lung cancer screening works and the need to inform health professionals and their … Continue reading →

10 Years And Half A Million Words…

I just noticed this blog celebrated its 10th anniversary this September. So I hope you won’t mind me taking this opportunity to share some observations and reminiscences of what it’s been like to document by blog a decade of the changing landscape of cancer.

The first blog was published on September 9, 2005 when I introduced the blog and my vision for what i hoped it would represent.

The blog originated with a concept developed by our media relations team. Social media was just coming into prominence, and the Society was looking at ways to get into this space. Bob Lutz, a senior executive at General Motors at the time, was the model: he wrote a regular blog himself, and was pretty open in sharing his thoughts. It was clearly not one of those ghost written, pre-packaged types of things. How he found the time to do a blog was an interesting question, but the concept was intriguing: if we could have one of our senior folks write something similar, perhaps it would get some recognition in this rapidly expanding means of communicating.

So we ventured into the space and I started writing “Dr. Len’s Blog”. One of … Continue reading →

The Survivors And Advocates Highlight That Personalized Medicine Is About All Of Us

When it comes to personalized/precision medicine we should never forget it’s all about the people, particularly the cancer survivors whose very lives depend on us getting it done quickly and getting it right.

That was the message from a discussion I had the privilege to moderate  on Monday evening with cancer survivors and representatives of advocacy organizations, professional associations, government agencies, and industry at a session held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO),  now wrapping up in Chicago.

There has been an incredible amount of big science presented at this meeting that relates very directly to the care we provide cancer patients. Some of that science has immediate application to cancer care. On several occasions, acknowledged experts opined in front of thousands of physicians, other scientists, and health professionals that new treatments-particularly immunotherapy-were new standards of care in the management of patients with certain cancers.

Running in parallel to the development of new approaches to the treatment of cancer is the science that is helping to define and personalize which patients would benefit most from which treatments. As an example, for the new immunotherapy drugs there are biomarkers that may eventually … Continue reading →

What We Can All Learn As New Orleans Shows The Way To A Healthier, Smoke-Free City

 

It’s a headline that I suspect many thought would never be written, but it was-in the New Orleans Advocate on April 22:

“Harrah’s Casino in New Orleans gives patrons lollipops as it introduces smoking ban”

Six months ago, there weren’t many who thought this could happen, that the City Council of New Orleans would pass and the Mayor would sign a smoke-free bar and casino ordinance in New Orleans. But pass it they did, and now it’s the law.

The lesson from this incredible feat is that when we are committed to making our lives healthier and safer we can make it happen. It may be through smoke-free legislation or it may be through increasing tobacco taxes. But these laws and regulations make a difference for so many, from workers who work in these establishments, to those who patronize them and to those entertain us there such as the musicians in New Orleans, who were so much a part of making this happen.

However, we can’t forget that while successes are wonderful to celebrate much remains to be done. And that is why I continue to work closely with the Society’s advocacy affiliate, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Continue reading →

In New Orleans’ Efforts To Make Bars and Casinos Smoke Free, It’s The Musicians’ Songs That Are the Sweetest.

Let’s call it the Battle of New Orleans, 2015.

As I write this, I am traveling from a meeting of the New Orleans City Council where testimony was heard regarding a new ordinance which would prohibit smoking in the city’s famed bars and the local casino.

As noted by Councilwoman LaToya Cantrell-who is the lead sponsor of the bill and who chaired the meeting–at the end of the hearing, it is a topic which has certainly engendered a lot of discussion among the residents of this iconic American city. Even when sitting in the airport the morning after the meeting I happened to overhear a gentleman near me intensely discussing the merits of the recommendations on the phone with a friend.

But loudest among the many voices were the sweet sounds that came from the musicians who provided testimony to the Council. There was no opposition from the music world: these artists earn their living inhaling the smoke of others, and they came out loud and clear about the need and benefit of being able to provide us entertainment in a healthier, smoke-free environment. As one of them noted a performer doesn’t have to consume a bit of every alcoholic … Continue reading →

An Impassioned Woman, A Young Man, And A Message About Tobacco That Can Teach All Of Us A Lesson

With a dedication and thanks to Carolyn for her passion about the impact of smoking, especially on our youth.

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You never know when something special is going to happen, as in one of those times when you just wish you had a camera rolling to capture a moment, a comment, a statement about the way the world is–and the way the world could be.

This past weekend my wife and I were attending a meeting in Baltimore when we had one of those moments. Nothing complicated, just very interesting–and very informative in so many ways.

It was at a convenience store near our hotel. We had gone out to get some things for the room, and when we got to the store there were a number of young men sitting on the stoop at the entrance to the store. Maybe 5 or 6 total, about 12 or 13 years old, dressed for school, sitting and enjoying the day.

They were just chatting, and when we asked to be able to open the door to the store they immediately moved aside. But what I wanted to say and didn’t say to one of them who was puffing away on one … Continue reading →

Cancer and the Latino Community: Lessons Learned

I had the privilege this week to serve as the keynote speaker for the 4th Summit sponsored by Latinas Contra Cancer-an organization founded and led by Ysabel Duron, a formidable cancer survivor and news media presence in San Francisco.

Bringing together members of the Latino community, researchers, community health workers, promotores (more on that later) and advocates, the summit focused on the issues facing the Latino community in increasing awareness, access to care, improved treatment and research opportunities among other topics. But what was most impressive was the spirit, engagement and commitment that permeated the room for the two days of the meeting.

I would like to share with you some of what I learned during the preparation for that lecture, as well as some observations that tie together the impact and calls to action that are relevant to the Latino community and many other ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the United States. (You may wish to refer to the American Cancer Society’s “Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014” which contains a wealth of information relative to cancer for this community.) [more]

When one takes a closer look at the Latino community, one finds there are … Continue reading →

Social Media And Cancer Awareness: Are We Smart Enough To Take Advantage Of The Opportunity?

This past week I had the privilege of participating in a meeting hosted by the President’s Cancer Panel on the role of social media in improving cancer control and treatment. The goal was to give advice to the Panel on a planned series of meetings they will be convening to discuss the topic. It was the range and quality of the discussion that day that left me thinking about the broader topic of social media and how it could help improve cancer control going forward. [more]

I do not profess to be a social media expert. I do (obviously) engage in social media in a couple of ways, primarily through my blogs and Twitter (@DrLen), but I am not an addict. And notwithstanding the fact that social media has become a standard communication format for many folks, especially the younger generation, I still wonder how we are going to harness this revolution to improve what people know about cancer, what we can do with that information and how we can raise awareness about cancer-related issues such as new treatments, prevention, survivorship and clinical trials among many other topics.

The reality is that there hasn’t been much impact of social media … Continue reading →

Lung-MAP–A Bold Initiative To Find New Treatments For Squamous Cell Lung Cancer–Launches Today

Today marks a major step forward in cancer clinical trials and drug development with the launch of the Lung-MAP protocol to evaluate new treatments for squamous cell lung cancer, a common cancer which has proven resistant to the standard drugs currently available. In response to this genuine unmet need, Lung-MAP has been designed to move new therapies more quickly from the laboratory to the bedside of patients afflicted with this serious disease and few options available.

Many–including present company–have written about the need to improve this process. We are in a new era of cancer drug development, spearheaded by our ever increasing knowledge of cancer genes and the targets within those genes that can be used to disrupt the cancer cell on its inexorable road to proliferation and destruction. Getting those drugs speedily through development and clinical testing has been a real challenge. And, going forward, finding the patients with the “right” genomic signature who are candidates to receive these therapies is going to be difficult. In simple terms, we need to find the patients where they live and match them to these new drugs as quickly as possible. And that hopefully will translate into more and … Continue reading →