Rectal Cancer

CanceRX 2014: We Need Innovative Approaches To Support Cancer Drug Development

What if you were sitting in the room with some of the best financial and scientific minds in the country and someone asked how many of you would be willing to contribute a modest sum of money to create a company with the potential of speeding up the evaluation of drugs that could revolutionize cancer treatment?

That was the opening question of a fascinating meeting I attended recently at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one where I didn’t want to leave my seat for a moment for fear I would miss another thought-provoking comment or idea.

The meeting was called CanceRX 2014, and for two solid days about 300 participants listened, debated, and engaged in discussion on how to make that scenario happen. No small task, to be certain. But in this era of ever increasing research discoveries of new treatment targets, it is clear that we need some innovative thinking to take what we learn in the laboratory to the bedsides of the patients we care for. And to make that happen we need as much “out of the box” thinking as we can muster. [more]

Let’s assume that we can  continue to accomplish the grand goals … Continue reading →

Breast Cancer Awareness Is About More Than Mammograms: What You Need To Know

It’s October and that means we are about to see a lot of pink for the next 31 days. And virtually all of the work comes down to one simple -some might say overly simple-message: get a mammogram.

But as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM), begins, I find myself one again asking some difficult questions: Are we really looking at the right side of the equation? Is it all about mammograms? Is there more to the story? The answer is absolutely unequivocal and without a moments hesitation: YES! [more]

There’s no doubt NBCAM  is a big deal. In fact it’s probably the biggest cancer care effort for the entire year. It has been enormously successful in bringing attention to breast cancer and creating public focus on a very important issue for women and the men who love them, even as it does crowd out attention to other cancers that also deserve our attention, like lung, childhood cancer, ovarian cancer, and on and on.

And why shouldn’t we highlight mammography’s role? In the bad old days, as a much younger oncologist, I used to dream of a day when we could have not only better treatments for cancer, … Continue reading →

Is It Too Much To Expect More Balance When Discussing Proton Beam Therapy For Cancer Patients?

I had an interesting day this past week. Sadly, it left me wondering why the same “hope and hype” directed at cancer patients and their families decades ago when I started my oncology career was still alive and well today. But then, maybe I am the naïve one to think that anything should have really changed.

In the morning I found out that a story I had been interviewed for a story which appeared on the Kaiser Health News website. A discussion about proton beam therapy for cancer (PBT), it basically pointed out that insurers aren’t necessarily paying for the treatment and that the information supporting its use is not as definitive as some would hope or claim.

Not long after, I was informed of an online discussion  on Twitter (called a “tweet chat” at #protonbeam) being hosted by a major medical institution and a well-known weekly newsmagazine on the very topic of proton beam therapy, or PBT. What I watched unfold over the hour-long discussion was what I call a “scrum” of doctors and public relations people promoting proton beam therapy as the answer to many cancer treatment dilemmas with nary a word about the  limitations of our … Continue reading →

We Need A Sense Of Urgency To Assure The Safety Of Health Information Technology

This was the dream: we would use technology to create a seamless healthcare system, one where people, computers and machines would work together to improve patient care in many different ways. Health care would be more efficient, it would be safer, it would be less expensive, we would be able to transfer health-related information quickly and accurately.

After spending three days at a meeting this past week with some of the top experts in the field, I am not so certain that the dream is going to come true anytime soon. Perhaps more concerning, the problems–including patient safety issues–that are cropping up in so many areas are very troubling. [more]

The meeting was organized by three federal agencies involved in the oversight of medical devices, applications and health information technology including the Food and Drug Administration, the Office of the National Coordinator for Heatlh Information Technology (housed in the Executive Branch) and the Federal Communications Commission. Those three agencies recently released a report describing their vision for regulation of health information technology. The purpose of the meeting was to extend the discussion. (I have listed links to several relevant documents at the end of this blog.)

I came … Continue reading →

The Haunting Memories When Screening Doesn’t Work

I had the opportunity earlier this week to participate in a Twitter chat on the topic of colorectal cancer awareness. The chat was intended to bring attention to a nationwide campaign called “80 by 2018” designed to increase colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% of the population over the next 4 years. If it is successful, we should see a decline in both incidence and deaths from this disease.

But I am haunted by two of the comments I tweeted during the session chat that won’t leave my conscience:

“As a doc, you don’t forget the patients you couldn’t help. And you celebrate those you did. #CRCawareness is key #80by2018

“Let’s remember that screening doesn’t help everyone, so don’t forget the need for more research in understanding #CRC #80by2018

While we celebrate the opportunity to save more lives with screening, we cannot ignore or forget those for whom screening for colorectal cancer (or other cancers, for that matter) couldn’t or didn’t make a difference. [more]

Let me share a couple of stories with you. These are obviously people I have remembered over the years and who have had a continued impact for me personally.

The first person … Continue reading →

Progress In Colorectal Cancer Not Shared By Everyone

An article published this week in the American Cancer Society journal CA: A Journal for Clinicians received a lot of media attention. The report showed dramatic declines in the rate of people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer, as well as decreases in the rates of colorectal cancer deaths over the past number of years.

But the press didn’t say much about the fact that not everyone has benefitted from the progress we have made in the prevention, early detection, and improved treatment for colorectal cancer. It is a sad but very real commentary on how we approach health care in this country that African Americans have not benefitted equally from this progress in treating a cancer that for many people can be prevented or effectively treated when found before it spreads to other parts of the body.

As a nation, I believe it is incumbent that we address this glaring health disparity. To do less is unacceptable. [more]

Here are some examples from the research report:

1)      During 2006 to 2010, colorectal cancer incidence rates in blacks were approximately 25% higher than those in whites, and 50% higher than those of Asian-Pacific Islander descent

2)      A larger disparity exists Continue reading →

Palliative Care Is About Quality Of Life Throughout The Cancer Journey

A newspaper story last week caught my eye when it headlined: “Senators Revive Push for End-of-Life-Care Planning.” It reported on new legislation making the rounds in Washington to address care planning for those with advanced illnesses.

You remember “end of life care planning,” don’t you? It was part of the Affordable Care Act debate several years ago, and quickly became translated into “death panels” where opponents made the argument that the government wanted to help people decide not to receive needed treatment. That was a moment that will live in my memory forever, and it’s not a pleasant memory.

So here we are with this new bill, and a headline that suggests we may be headed down the same path once again. This time, however, I hope we can have a more rational and appropriate discussion about an issue that is rapidly evolving in cancer care, supported by medical evidence and medical professionals, not to mention organizations like the American Cancer Society who believe the time has come to engage our patients, their families and caregivers, and the nation at large in understanding the need for compassion as we care for patients with serious illness, including cancer. [more]

First of … Continue reading →

Will Genomics Lead Us To A Brave New World Of Cancer Diagnosis?

 

One of the things I enjoy about coming to meetings like the current annual session of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is that it gives me a chance to give thought to some larger questions that face cancer care. A presentation I attended Friday afternoon on the impact of genomics on cancer diagnosis and treatment in the future has offered just such an opportunity.

 

Most of you I suspect give little thought to the actual processes that we use to diagnose cancer. One has a tumor somewhere in the body, the doctors take a specimen, send it to the pathologist and the pathologist makes the diagnosis. Simple and straightforward. Get it done and get on with treatment.

 

But in fact it isn’t so simple and straightforward. And in the world we live in, it is getting more and more complex.

 

Looking at cancer tissue under the microscope is something that has been done for over a century. More recently, we have seen the advent of special additional tests that tell us for example whether or not a cancer such as breast cancer is hormone sensitive or whether it has other markers such as HER2. … Continue reading →

Weight And Inactivity Are Threatening To Overtake Tobacco As Risk Factors For Cancer According To Annual Report To The Nation

The “Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer” was released this afternoon as has been the case every year since the first report was issued in 1998. And, like many of the reports previously, we are fortunate to continue to see declines in the rates of deaths for many cancers along with a decrease in the frequency of some cancers.

 

However, the news is not all good.

 

Unfortunately, the incidence of some cancers continues to increase. And, as explained very clearly in this excellent report, this nation continues to suffer from an epidemic of overweight, obesity and physical activity that the authors suggest-but don’t actually say-has the potential to overcome the favorable impact of declining smoking and tobacco use on cancer incidence and deaths. The implication is clear that if we don’t do something-and do something quickly-to reverse the trend we will see incidence and deaths from certain cancers continue to increase in the future.

 

And I would stress the point that it is no longer just being oversized that increases your risk of cancer, but also sitting all day on the job (like I am doing right now) as another factor that plays … Continue reading →

The 2010 Statistics Are Out, And 767,000 People Have Celebrated More Birthdays

Every year the American Cancer Society provides a report that is one of the most widely quoted scientific articles in this country.  This year’s “Cancer Statistics, 2010” report was released this morning, and provides a considerable amount of information regarding the burden of cancer in the United States, such as the expected number of new cancer cases and number of cancer deaths in the United States in 2010.

 

As part of the same report, my colleagues at the American Cancer Society also dissect the numbers and provide insight into the trends in cancer incidence and deaths, what is happening and perhaps why it is happening.  Statistics–no matter how good you are at writing reports–are always somewhat droll and boring.  But there are the occasional pearls that leap out at you from time to time, especially if you are interested in this particular subject (which obviously, I am).

 

Some good news is that–as we have seen in recent years–the death rates from cancer in this country continue their steady decline since the early 1990’s.  For men of all races, death rates from cancer have fallen 21% between 1990 and 2006, the latest year for which accurate information is available.  … Continue reading →