Monthly Archives: October 2015

The Updated Breast Cancer Screening Guideline From The American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society has now released its newly updated Breast Cancer Screening guideline in the Journal of the American Medical Association

This guideline—which was last updated in 2003—reflects the American Cancer Society’s best thinking on breast cancer screening for women at average risk of breast cancer. They are not intended for women at high risk, such as those with genetic abnormalities (BRCA as an example), a personal history of breast cancer or a history of radiation therapy prior to age 30.  That guideline is available on our website at www.cancer.org.

So let’s get right to the heart of the matter: what are the new recommendations?

  1. Women with an average risk of breast cancer should undergo regular screening mammography starting at age 45 (Strong recommendation*)

          1a) Women aged 45 to 54 years should be screened annually (Qualified       recommendation*)

          1b) Women 55 years and older should transition to biennial screening or have the opportunity to continue screening annually. (*Qualified recommendation)

          1c) Women should have the opportunity to begin annual screening between the ages of 40 and 44 years (Qualified recommendation*)

2) Continue reading →

10 Years And Half A Million Words…

I just noticed this blog celebrated its 10th anniversary this September. So I hope you won’t mind me taking this opportunity to share some observations and reminiscences of what it’s been like to document by blog a decade of the changing landscape of cancer.

The first blog was published on September 9, 2005 when I introduced the blog and my vision for what i hoped it would represent.

The blog originated with a concept developed by our media relations team. Social media was just coming into prominence, and the Society was looking at ways to get into this space. Bob Lutz, a senior executive at General Motors at the time, was the model: he wrote a regular blog himself, and was pretty open in sharing his thoughts. It was clearly not one of those ghost written, pre-packaged types of things. How he found the time to do a blog was an interesting question, but the concept was intriguing: if we could have one of our senior folks write something similar, perhaps it would get some recognition in this rapidly expanding means of communicating.

So we ventured into the space and I started writing “Dr. Len’s Blog”. One of … Continue reading →

Granny’s Gone: On Saving Lives And Honoring Life

Granny and her five generations
Granny and the five generations

Granny’s gone.

She left us this past week, 93 years young. Sadly, five generations are now four.

Yes, cancer was part of her journey. For the rest of us, that journey serves as a poignant lesson on the balance between saving lives and honoring life.… Continue reading →

The Commission on Cancer: An “Unsung Hero” Of Cancer Care

Sometimes we take for granted what goes on behind the scenes to improve the care offered to patients with cancer.

Having spent two days in Chicago attending meetings of the Commission on Cancer recently, I think it is worth highlighting and commending the work done by this very special organization and the volunteers and staff who make it possible—and successful as well.

Cancer is a complex disease. And it is no secret that not every person with cancer either can or even wants to be treated at a major research center when diagnosed with cancer. That means many of us with cancer are treated locally, some in large “megasystem” hospitals that are popping up across the country to much smaller institutions like the one that serves my hometown community in South Georgia.

But when you walk in the door, do you ever wonder who does the check-up to be certain that the hospital meets acceptable standards of cancer care? Is there anyone watching the store?

For more than 1500 hospitals across the country, that organization is the Commission on Cancer (CoC).  Established by the American College of Surgeons in 1922, the Commission on Cancer develops standards to ensure high quality, … Continue reading →