Monthly Archives: May 2015

Father Knows Best As Immunotherapy Takes Its Place As A Pillar Of Cancer Care

Question: What do all these cancers have in common: Melanoma, lung, kidney, bladder, ovarian, head and neck, Hodgkin lymphoma, stomach, breast (and others)?

Answer: They have all shown evidence of meaningful, durable responses when treated with one or more of the new immunotherapy drugs. And that is truly amazing-not to mention very unexpected, even by the experts who know this stuff.

That’s the message that is coming out of the 2015 annual scientific meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, where thousands of doctors, researchers and others from around the world make the annual trek to Chicago to share and learn the latest advances in cancer treatment.

The journey to this point has been fascinating. [more]

I personally had some interests in immunotherapy research back in the 1970’s when I was at the National Cancer Institute. We knew that our bodies’ immune systems could recognize some cancers as “foreign”, particularly melanoma and kidney cancer. Even though we had evidence that our bodies could recognize these cancer cells weren’t normal, our natural, “built-in” defense systems sometimes didn’t attack those cancers. The goal was to figure out how to make the immune system wake up and do its job. We … Continue reading →

Advancing The Tenet That In Cancer Care We Need To Embrace Curing When We Can And Comforting Always

It was the title of an article in JAMA Oncology that captured my attention this past week: “Advancing a Quality-of-Life Agenda in Cancer Advocacy: Beyond the War Metaphor.” That and, the fact that two of the authors (Rebecca Kirch and Otis Brawley) are my colleagues from the American Cancer Society.

As the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convenes its annual scientific meeting in Chicago–where thousands of participants from around the world gather to learn about the latest advances in cancer research and treatment–we should not lose sight of the fact that the quality of life for patients during cancer treatment and survival is a critical part of what we must address as part of a holistic approach to the cancer care paradigm.

For decades cancer prevention and treatment has focused on the war metaphor: fight cancer, beat cancer, fight hard, whatever. The reality is that not infrequently people do everything right and they still die from this dread disease. Does that mean they didn’t fight hard enough? I don’t think so, and I suspect many of you agree.

But there is a yawning gap, and that is that we don’t pay as much attention to the … Continue reading →

Laboratory Tests And Disruption In Medical Care: A New Frontier

(This blog was originally published on Medpage Today and is presented here with permission)

 

Disruptive innovation is a relatively new term that refers to dynamic changes in how we live our lives. Think of your smartphone and you have a good example of disruptive technology; one that replaces old tools. Who even takes pictures with a point and shoot camera any more, or uses a map to find their way? But the rise of disruptive technologies in medicine to me raises some difficult questions.

The recent announcement by a company called Color Genomics which will provide a 19 gene assay to help women assess their risk of breast and ovarian cancer could be called a disruptive innovation. For $249, a woman can have this panel of tests done at her request so long as she has a health professional order it.

And if she doesn’t have a health professional readily available, the company will be glad to provide one.

Oh, and by the way: they don’t accept insurance. They reason: the company says the cost is so low that insurance companies shouldn’t come between women and the test. And if you want genetic counseling, they will provide that too … Continue reading →

Don’t Fry Day Reminds Us To Stay Safe In The Sun

It’s that time of year again, those months we all look forward to when life (sometimes) gets a little bit slower, the days a bit longer, and many of us take (yes!!!!!) a vacation. It’s also time for Don’t Fry Day, which is the Friday before Memorial Day. That’s the day when organizations including the American Cancer Society and led by the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention remind you to be sun safe, and know what to do to protect the skin you are in.

From an American Cancer Society perspective, the rules are pretty straight forward and easy to remember:

  • Slip! (on a shirt)
  • Slop! (on the sunscreen)
  • Slap! (on a wide brimmed hat), and
  • Wrap! (on a pair of UV protective sunglasses)

I could go through a long list of what you should do and how you should do it to protect your skin, but it’s easier to go to our website or to the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention website for that information. You should take the information to heart. Skin damage isn’t a walk in the park (or on the beach, for that matter)-either now while you may be on vacation, or years … Continue reading →

The Fault In Our Stars: When Celebrity Health Advice Conflicts With Our Science

Dealing with a diagnosis of cancer remains a very scary, emotionally charged experience. That experience is not helped by the addition of conflicting advice, especially advice based on opinion and not evidence. And once in a while, that’s what happens when a celebrity is the source of the information, as has now occurred with Sandra Lee. But this time reporters are stepping up to address the issue on the record.

Many of you are familiar with the now widely available interview Ms. Lee gave with ABC’s Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts, herself a cancer survivor who has openly shared her journey with the public. Ms. Lee told the nation that she has breast cancer, that a lumpectomy had positive margins, and that her doctors recommended a double mastectomy since she was a “ticking time bomb” in her words.

What the nation also knows is that Ms. Lee at the age of 48 was critical of guidelines that-in her words-tell women to wait until they are 50 to get a screening mammogram. She also recommended that women of all ages, even in their 20s and 30s, call their health professional now and get a mammogram. In short, all … Continue reading →