Monthly Archives: April 2015

What We Can All Learn As New Orleans Shows The Way To A Healthier, Smoke-Free City

 

It’s a headline that I suspect many thought would never be written, but it was-in the New Orleans Advocate on April 22:

“Harrah’s Casino in New Orleans gives patrons lollipops as it introduces smoking ban”

Six months ago, there weren’t many who thought this could happen, that the City Council of New Orleans would pass and the Mayor would sign a smoke-free bar and casino ordinance in New Orleans. But pass it they did, and now it’s the law.

The lesson from this incredible feat is that when we are committed to making our lives healthier and safer we can make it happen. It may be through smoke-free legislation or it may be through increasing tobacco taxes. But these laws and regulations make a difference for so many, from workers who work in these establishments, to those who patronize them and to those entertain us there such as the musicians in New Orleans, who were so much a part of making this happen.

However, we can’t forget that while successes are wonderful to celebrate much remains to be done. And that is why I continue to work closely with the Society’s advocacy affiliate, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Continue reading →

Are We Ready For Inexpensive, Patient Directed Genetic Testing For Breast Cancer?

Years ago when I first started this blog I wrote about the democratization of information, and how people would come to an era where they had ready access to  information yet reserved  the right to determine whether that information was valid or not.

Fast forward to today, and a company called Color Genomics announced a new genomic based profile to measure breast cancer risk. They are clearly headed into the democratization of health care, since they are pricing the test at $249 and have tried to reduce the barriers for women and men to get the test.

Inevitably, this announcement is going to fan the flames of how far we should be going to allow people to get whatever laboratory tests they would like, whenever they want them. Although a health professional must order the test, in reality doctors will be available to meet your need if you decide to bypass your personal physician. And although most professional organizations active in this field recommend genetic counseling from a qualified professional be done  before such tests are done, the company says they will provide such counseling-after the test results are known. [more]

When it comes to expert opinion about … Continue reading →