Monthly Archives: November 2014

Number Of Skin Cancers And Costs Of Treatment Have Increased Dramatically Reinforcing Need For Prevention

The numbers about skin cancer incidence and costs in the United States are worse than anyone expected.

That’s the message that comes from a report published recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine on research from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Cancer Institute.

The researchers took a look at the number of skin cancers–both melanoma and non-melanoma–that were diagnosed in the United States for two different periods of time, from 2002-2006 and 2007-2011. They also examined the total cost of care for the treatment of those patients.

The staggering reality is that the average number of skin cancers diagnosed in this country in people 18 and older went from 3.4 million per year during the first time frame to 4.9 million in the second period. That means through 2011 that close to 5,000,000 (yes, 5 million) adults have a skin cancer diagnosed every year-and today that number may even be higher. [more]

In specific groups of people analyzed in this report, the researchers found the percentage of men age 65 and over diagnosed with a skin cancer in any given year went from 7% to … Continue reading →

Defining Value in Cancer Care Depends On Your Perspective

(This blog was originally posted on Medpage Today and is reprinted here with permission)

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Value.

A simple word with lots of meanings, all of which depend on the context of the moment. Value in healthcare — especially in cancer care — is certainly no exception. What is undeniable is that we are seeing an increasing clamor about value in cancer treatment. And one person’s value is clearly another person’s concern.

At the crux of the debate is the question of whether we will continue to see improvements in cancer care that are meaningful, and whether we will be able to support the very innovation that, in no small part, holds such great promise for the future of making cancer a chronic disease for many and even finding a cure for some.

A recent Washington conference sponsored by the Turning The Tide Against Cancercoalition is an excellent case in point.

Conference organizers brought together experts from around the country who are vitally concerned about the progress we are making, and must continue to make, in elevating personalized (or precision) medicine as a key part of advancing cancer research and cancer care. The agenda included a number of presentations … Continue reading →

CanceRX 2014: We Need Innovative Approaches To Support Cancer Drug Development

What if you were sitting in the room with some of the best financial and scientific minds in the country and someone asked how many of you would be willing to contribute a modest sum of money to create a company with the potential of speeding up the evaluation of drugs that could revolutionize cancer treatment?

That was the opening question of a fascinating meeting I attended recently at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one where I didn’t want to leave my seat for a moment for fear I would miss another thought-provoking comment or idea.

The meeting was called CanceRX 2014, and for two solid days about 300 participants listened, debated, and engaged in discussion on how to make that scenario happen. No small task, to be certain. But in this era of ever increasing research discoveries of new treatment targets, it is clear that we need some innovative thinking to take what we learn in the laboratory to the bedsides of the patients we care for. And to make that happen we need as much “out of the box” thinking as we can muster. [more]

Let’s assume that we can  continue to accomplish the grand goals … Continue reading →